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The Brain and Stereotyping – Managed IT Services in Miami

It’s completely natural for our brains to create stereotypes. Our brains are programmed to make instant decisions and this proves to be helpful in many cases. Stereotypes are essentially shortcuts that our brains make – and there is nothing wrong with this. In fact, we hold onto most stereotypes unconsciously.

It’s when we hold onto these stereotypes for longer than we need to and they become biases that they could form a problem.

Professional stereotypes and discrimination

We place many laws on employers to prevent them from discriminating against people during the recruitment process.

For example, in most developed companies it is illegal to discriminate against a candidate because of their gender or their race. But is it really possible to prevent ourselves from unconsciously doing this once we’re aware of these stereotypes.

Let’s take an example of a recruiter hiring for a job in Managed IT Services in Miami. The male recruiter is well aware that of the stereotype that women aren’t as capable in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) positions. Once that is embedded inside him, can he really treat the candidate truly equally? That’s not to say that he’ll discriminate negatively against the candidate. Perhaps in an effort to disprove his prejudice, he gives the female candidate an easier ride. It could be argued that, whatever way he goes, there’s a form of discrimination that can’t be helped.

Social stereotypes and discrimination

It could argued that social stereotypes are less of a big deal, unless they’re spiteful or disrespectful. This could be labelled xenophobia or racism, rather than stereotyping, and there’s not much of an argument against this being a terrible thing that needs to be rid from society.

But, what about supposedly ‘friendly’ or ‘amusing’ social stereotypes? The fact that an IT worker is shy and introverted or that a long blonde-haired surfer from Miami is always relaxed. Are these stereotypes more harmless? Perhaps, in the sense that they are less likely to offend people. But there’s an argument that these stereotypes can limit people from reaching their true potential if people start to believe them about themselves.

What about the belief that people living in trailer parks are lazy and uneducated? In a professional setting, it’s probably illegal to stereotype this way in a job interview. But it could be just as harmful in a social setting, especially if people believe this about themselves.

As Henry Ford famous said “Whether you think you can or you think you can’t, you’re probably right.” A negative self-stereotype will lead to more people thinking they can’t, limiting their potential to do great things in this life.

The best way to ignore self-stereotypes is to be aware of them – then do everything you can to prove them wrong. It’s a great strategy for dealing with stereotypes of other people too.

What happens when you meet someone who works in IT support in Miami. Are they geeky or are they lazy? Probably you’ll make your own mind up when you meet them…Perhaps we should do this whenever we meet anyone.